Why Sugar is Dangerous?

Published 2 years ago  in Blogs
 

Why Sugar is Dangerous?

So what happens when you consume too much sugar? The body begins to react negatively. At first, the pancreas tends to produce more insulin to normalize blood glucose rates, however, with time, it starts to not account for so much demand. The insulin’s ability to bind to glucose is being reduced and the person develops glucose intolerance. Moreover, the production of the hormone itself begins to come into partial failure (pancreas begins to produce too little insulin) or total (the hormone ceases to be synthesized) that characterizes diabetes. If the insulin does not work, glucose is in excess in the blood and consequences of diabetes are many, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disorders, neurological, eyes and kidneys.
Another important aspect of the excessive consumption of sugar is overweight and the risk of obesity. Refined sugar, sweets and soft drinks (which contain high amounts of sugar) are on the list of foods known as empty calories. You may have heard of empty calories at some point. They are foods that are quickly absorbed by the body and converted into energy, but are not nutritionally adequate when viewed in terms of fiber content, vitamins and minerals. Summarizing, many calories and little or no nutrient! In addition, the body uses only a part of that energy, mostly converted to fat because the body does not need all of these calories, and then they are converted to adipose tissue for storage. Besides a possible dissatisfaction with appearance, the accumulation of body fat can lead to serious diseases such as hypertension and other heart diseases.